Stories

How the Other Half Dies

Posted by on Nov 24, 2014 in Blog, Stories | 0 comments

How the Other Half Dies

By Tukaram Jamale, MD Just at the closure of our OPD (Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) in that hot and humid summer when we were discussing plans for the day’s admissions, Mr Ramesh Vichare was rushed in to the room by his son and wife who barely managed to keep him steady in the wheel chair. He hailed from the interior district of Western India, about 500km from Mumbai. His white pale skin was oozing from scratch marks and each of his limbs were about the thickness of a small tree branch. Prior to this visit, he was diagnosed with end stage kidney disease (ESRD) about a month ago and...

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Primary Care Progress: Essential to Reduce Costs of Care

Posted by on Nov 17, 2014 in Blog, Stories | 2 comments

Primary Care Progress: Essential to Reduce Costs of Care

By  Jonathan Jimenez and Chloe Ciccariello “Have you been able to tell your boss?” Ms. S looked down and laughed sheepishly. She was a sinewy, small woman who laughed frequently–reminding me of my mother. Her lean, muscular arms did not betray her uncontrolled type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Her hemoglobin a1c, a lab test used to tell us how well the disease is managed, had been zig zagging around 13% for years – way too high. This value indicates that she is at risk for all the terrible sequelae of diabetes – nerve problems, heart disease, kidney injury and blindness....

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A Difficult Pill to Swallow

Posted by on Oct 27, 2014 in Blog, Stories | 0 comments

A Difficult Pill to Swallow

By Brandon Kopper I am currently a pharmacy student, and although I have not yet dispensed a medication, I had my first experience concerning the cost of care a few months ago. My ear hurt very badly when I woke up in the morning, and being that I had to go to work later that evening, I decided to go to the local clinic in order to get my ear treated. The physician was able to diagnose the problem, and I was sent home with a prescription. I do not recall the name of the medication that I was prescribed, but I do remember my reaction when I went to pick it up at the drugstore. I was shocked...

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Training on Cost Decisions at the Bedside

Posted by on Oct 20, 2014 in Blog, Stories | 2 comments

Training on Cost Decisions at the Bedside

By Nandita Mani and Elizabeth Oler Medical students are brilliantly frugal. And it’s no surprise — according to the AAMC, the average U.S. medical student incurs $170,000 of debt from medical education. We are a resourceful, smart, and cost-conscious group — so why is the medical school curriculum practically silent on the cost of medicine? During medical school, we are taught to be excellent diagnosticians. The third and fourth years of training provide 60 to 80 hours a week of hands-on learning in the hospital and clinic. We diligently elicit patient histories, perform...

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Comparison of Care: Why One Child Will Die After a Dog Bite and Another Will Survive an Incurable Heart Condition

Posted by on Oct 13, 2014 in Blog, Stories | 1 comment

Comparison of Care: Why One Child Will Die After a Dog Bite and Another Will Survive an Incurable Heart Condition

By Caroline Smith As I finish my post-operative care routine for my nine-day-old patient, I notice that the cerebral oximetry machine is not picking up a strong signal. Despite troubleshooting, I am unable to figure out how to fix the problem, and I head to the Pixus to get a new sensor. Unfortunately, this one does not work either, and we must use a smaller sensor to pick up an adequate signal on this very sick baby. As I meticulously apply the sensor, a nurse jokingly chides me, “Don’t worry, those only cost $200 a pop.” I must look horrified, because another nurse turns to me....

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