Stories

Impact of Admission Status on Healthcare

Posted by on Jul 20, 2015 in Blog, Stories | 4 comments

Impact of Admission Status on Healthcare

By Amit Vashist, MD, MBA “I do not want to stay in the hospital if you’re gonna admit me as obs”, my 68 year old patient bluntly told me in response to my comment that I would be admitting her under the observation status. This patient had nearly passed out in her gastroenterologist’s office and had been sent to our emergency department for further evaluation. She had been experiencing these episodes for about 2 months but had not sought any medical attention so far. Her initial lab chemistries and head imaging had come out to be negative in the emergency room but it was clear in my...

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July as the “Cost of Care” Awareness Month

Posted by on Jul 13, 2015 in Blog, Stories | 1 comment

July as the “Cost of Care” Awareness Month

By Jonas A. de Souza With a 2013 median US household income of $51,539, it is clear that having treatments that cost over $100,000 per year is unsustainable. However, this is exactly what is happening to patients who need these treatments. The last decade has brought tremendous advancements in drug development through the creation of unique, targeted therapies. However the cost of care has skyrocketed in parallel to the increase in innovation. This increasing cost of care has led to a new side effect: financial toxicity. What exactly is this side effect? We define financial toxicity as the...

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Eliminating Waste in our Medical System

Posted by on Jun 29, 2015 in Blog, Stories | 5 comments

Eliminating Waste in our Medical System

By Kevin Mikielski “I told them that I just had a stress test two months ago.” This was the quote from one of my patients that I have been seeing for the past six years in my private cardiology practice. She is a 72 year old with diabetes who presented two months prior with worsening dyspnea. An exercise stress test with nuclear imaging was performed with normal results. She was then admitted at a local hospital with atypical chest and midepigastric pain. The EKG was normal and cardiac enzymes x 2 were negative. The admitting physician, not knowing previous tests were already performed,...

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What’s Good for the Back Isn’t Good for the Wallet: A Patient’s Story

Posted by on Jun 22, 2015 in Blog, Stories | 3 comments

What’s Good for the Back Isn’t Good for the Wallet: A Patient’s Story

By Caren Gussoff Sumption The pains in my back and hip started in my mid-­twenties, but it wasn’t until my first plaque psoriasis outbreak at 35 ­­ both palms peeling off like a combination of a bad sunburn and dried airplane model glue ­­ that physicians could stop tossing theoreticals at me (Fibromyalgia! Lyme Disease! The fact that humans are inefficient bipeds!) and diagnose me with psoriatic arthritis. X­rays of my spine revealed an advanced case of ankylosing spondylitis, as well.  My rheumatologist went straight to TNF inhibitors; Enbrel, specifically, for no other...

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How does population health impact health care costs?

Posted by on Jun 15, 2015 in Blog, Stories | 2 comments

How does population health impact health care costs?

By Sophia Bernazzani The concept of population health is an increasingly important topic to consider when discussing the cost of health care; however, a recent article produced by MHA@GW, the online master of health administration offered through the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University, pointed out that it is a relatively new concept that is not yet universally understood. Along with the original definition of population health proposed by David Kindig and Greg Stoddart in 2003, “the health outcomes of a group of individuals, including the...

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