Stories

When Less Is More

Posted by on Sep 15, 2014 in Blog, Stories | 2 comments

When Less Is More

By Noura M. Dabbouseh, M.D. We speak of everyday decisions in terms of “cost-benefit” analyses. Many of our patients can’t afford a healthy meal, let alone a hefty hospital bill, thus making cost awareness increasingly relevant. But on the day that I met Mr. R., it wasn’t the financial aspects of his care that concerned me. I was thinking about the patient, his family, and two roads diverged in a hospital ward. I was thinking of the road less traveled, and the greener pasture oft overlooked. Mr. R. was a 70 year old male smoker with high blood pressure and the diagnosis of congestive...

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Patient Education – An Overlooked Factor in the Cost of Care

Posted by on Sep 8, 2014 in Blog, Stories | 1 comment

Patient Education – An Overlooked Factor in the Cost of Care

By Anonymous  There is a saying in the world of education, “You have to care to teach.” Why is it then in healthcare, a profession of and about caring, we do such a poor job of teaching our patients?  Is it because we are too busy or too rushed when we are sending our patient’s out the door of our hospitals, clinics or offices? After all, we have treated the patient and provided the “fix.” Is it because we do not take courses in how to teach patients effectively? Or, is it simply because we have not taken the time to fully appreciate the cost of ineffective patient teaching? The...

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The Cost of Miscommunication between Patient and Doctor

Posted by on Sep 1, 2014 in Blog, Stories | 2 comments

The Cost of Miscommunication between Patient and Doctor

By Kelley Cosgrove A few years ago, as I prepared for neurosurgery, a nurse who worked there told me, “Spend as little time in the hospital as possible, because the longer you stay, the more likely you are to get sick.” In a way, that statement seemed quite telling of what was to come for me and an indicator cost of care—the added cost of additional care, additional hospitalizations, and the additional illnesses that come along with that. Just days later, I realized how foreboding that exchange was. When I was admitted, I anticipated being in the hospital for one week or less. I had...

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Transparency for the Sake of Our Patients

Posted by on Aug 25, 2014 in Blog, Stories | 3 comments

Transparency for the Sake of Our Patients

By Ali Khoshnevi, MD My brother and I, both optometrists, had a heart-to-heart discussion about the loss of one of our patients. We discovered he was not taking his medications as prescribed, which was leading to vision loss. When pressed, the patient said he had a choice of eating, supporting his family, or purchasing his medication. He was under the impression that the $150 price for his generic Lipitor was “about the same” at any nearby pharmacy. We later realized that some of those nearby pharmacies charged from $11 to $25 for the same medication. Our studies revealed this...

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A Life Lesson in Cost-Awareness

Posted by on Aug 18, 2014 in Blog, Stories | 1 comment

A Life Lesson in Cost-Awareness

By Christi Lucus, RN, BSN It was July 2012 and I was pregnant with my third child. As an experienced mother and labor and delivery nurse, I felt very comfortable at 29 weeks gestation and anticipated the usual course of pregnancy. However, at 30 weeks, I started battling with preterm labor issues. This eventually led to the early delivery of my son, a four week and stay in the NICU, and a life lesson in cost-awareness of medical care. My third child, Alex, was due October 8, 2012. My husband and I were thrilled to be expecting our second son. As for myself, I anticipated a fairly normal...

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